“I believe that genre is called ‘clop clop,’ thank you.”

Dashing and daring, courageous and caring! These are words that COULD be used to describe your internet friends Brandon, Liz, Tom, and Jenny as they dive deeper into Zelda: Breath of the Wild, analyze the new hosts for The Great British Baking Show, and poke hesitantly at the trust fund kung fu of Iron Fist. Then, after the break, the gang watches some GOOD television with the revival of Samurai Jack, tumbles down a near-bottomless Disney Afternoon hole, gets wide-eyed and eager for Jordan Peele’s Get Out, and descends into the horrible bullshit surrounding the troubled release of Mass Effect: Andromeda. Oh, and a quick listener email!

(Heidi’s just here smoothin’ it in this episode, by the way. Ain’t no thang.)

Use Your Keyboard to Yell at Us

4 comments on “JKP! Ep.254: Moon Zoo

  1. Patrick Mar 22, 2017

    Having a blast with Breath of the Wild, charted more than 100 hours

    You can get Epona more than once if you don’t register her for the first time.

    I can confirm that Durian is at Dekalb Farmers Market and that it stinks but not nearly as bad as the fish market.

    Watch 3 episodes of Iron Fist and immediately searched for something else to watch on Netflix. I will eventually come back to it but man it’s a slog.

       1 likes

  2. Lianne Mar 23, 2017

    Very well said on the Mass Effect hoopla. What’s most difficult to convey is how one specific element in a game isn’t controlled by one team or heck even one person. Games are collaborative where one component, like animation, is affected by a myriad of moving parts. An animation could be made, but the AI system, state machines, the blending system, the real-time IK (which is what allows the feet to “auto-correct” itself on varying heights such as staircases, walls, inclines as Brandon brought up), the design specifications, the phoneme system, and so forth can utilize and break animations in the best and worst ways. Having this sort of layered approach gives games that interactive and unpredictable nature we all love, customization options for our characters (you can’t hand animate hours of cut scenes for each permutation of a character), and saves tons of man hours for the developer.

    But yeah, it causes the craziest bugs.

    And that’s not even touching the issues with game engines or system changes. A lot of times, features in a game engine/content editor aren’t available until far later than when everyone else needs it. It’s almost like building a bridge as you cross it. It’s a HUGE risk to change your own game engine (and ramp everyone up on it IF it’s even functional). Even if you license one (i.e. Unreal, Unity, etc.) you end up having to change it so much to fit the needs for the game, especially if it has a lot of complex systems as a lot of AAA games do.

    My friend, along with a bunch of other animators, did a detailed discussion on this topic. It’s a great behind-the-curtains talk on game animation and the technical aspects of the job:

    http://www.animstate.com/round-table-mass-effect-andromeda/

    Anyway, just wanted to give a cheers to you guys and gals, and I appreciate the empathy you give game developers.

       2 likes

  3. Also Sarah Mar 24, 2017

    Jenny, to jump your car over a submarine we are gonna need to do a few things. First, remove the engine, second fit a special pipe in the trunk area, then we’re going to use a large air cannon to fire your car over that submarine.

    https://youtu.be/-i-op1aceUg

    -TCG out

       3 likes

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